Austin Shakespeare’s intimate “Old Times” baffles, disturbs and moves

Jill Blackwood, Nancy Eyermann and Ben Wolfe in "Old Times." Contributed by Bret Brookshire
Jill Blackwood, Nancy Eyermann and Ben Wolfe in “Old Times.” Contributed by Bret Brookshire

Supposedly, while starring in a 1984 production of the Harold Pinter play “Old Times,” Anthony Hopkins asked the playwright what the play’s ending meant. Pinter’s reply? “I don’t know. Just do it.”

This anecdote is a fairly good summation of Pinter’s writing, which is at turns provocative, elliptical, off-putting and confusing. It is also poetic, precise and very, very good, which is part of the reason why Austin Shakespeare’s production of “Old Times” (originally produced in 1971) feels so fresh and contemporary.

The other reason, of course, is the high talents of the team behind this production, beginning with its performers.

The play features three character —  married couple, Kate and Deeley, and Kate’s old friend, Anna, who has come to visit them. It very quickly becomes clear that Kate and Anna were more than just friends, and Deeley spars with Anna for his wife’s affections, while at the same time finding himself increasingly attracted to her. The tension between the three characters is emotional, psychological and dangerously erotic, a balancing act that all three performers excel at.

As Deeley, Ben Wolfe’s increasing frustrations with both Anna and his own wife provide the play with its emotional arc. His confusion, anger and fear drive the action forward in a cohesive line, even as the plot and characterizations begin to deliberately crumble into surrealist territory. Jill Blackwood’s Anna is sleek, sexy and poised, a constant straight line standing between the curved, crooked figures of both the set and the married couple.

Nancy Eyermann, as Kate, gives a standout performance, vacillating between placid mutability and steely control, even as Deeley and Anna fight for/over her. The intimacy of the playing space, which is entirely in the round, allows for her subdued style to shine.old_times_cropped-3229

Rather than trying to clarify an intentionally vague and poetic plot, director Ann Ciccolella has leaned into the mounting sense of menace that “Old Times” develops as it goes on, particularly by embracing the full-on eeriness of the second act. The set, designed by Patrick W. Anthony, is a simple living room (and later a bedroom) with bare furniture, but one that is deliberately crooked and off-center, with far too much space inside, evoking both the distance between the characters and the existential gulf that the play creeps towards.

Anthony’s lighting, alongside sound design by Lowell Bartholomee, also plays a crucial role in the production, creating both tension and mood. It is, in fact, these design elements that get the final, powerful word, even after the actors have said their last lines. The light and sound fill up some of the famous “Pinter pauses” and imbue them with a power that differentiates them from those pauses merely filled by silence.

Old Times is a forceful and emotional play, even if it is one that lends itself to multiple interpretations, all or none of which may be correct. Austin Shakespeare’s production plays up the text’s most visceral and disturbing elements, making for a powerful evening of theater that may confuse your intellect while still ringing crystal clear to your senses and emotions.

“Old Times”

When: 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through March 5

Where: The Long Center, 701 W. Riverside Drive

Cost: $18-$44

Info: 512-474-5664, thelongcenter.org

 

‘The World According to Snoopy’ at Texas State delights with family fun

 

"The World According to Snoopy." Contributed by Kathy Houle
“The World According to Snoopy.” Contributed by Kathy Houle

 

In 1975, composer Larry Grossman and lyricist Hal Hackady premiered “Snoopy: The Musical,” a sequel to the hit show “You’re A Good Man Charlie Brown.” Similarly based on the Charles M. Schulz comic strip “Peanuts,” “Snoopy” (with a book by Warren Lockhart, Arthur Whitelaw and Michael L. Grace) never quite achieved the level of success that “Charlie Brown” did.

Kaitlin Hopkins, head of the musical theater program at Texas State University in San Marcos, aims to change that. Working with Grossman, Hopkins has revived “Snoopy: The Musical” as “The World According to Snoopy,” a new version of the show with a revised book from Hopkins, Grossman and choreographer Adam Cates, as well as an additional song featuring lyrics from Tony-nominated composer and lyricist Andrew Lippa.

After a successful workshop production in 2015, “The World According to Snoopy” will receive its full premiere at Texas State’s Performing Arts Center this week (produced by the Department of Theatre and Dance and running from Feb. 14-19) before moving on to a two-week run in Houston for Theatre Under the Stars. Not only does this provide a great opportunity for the talented young cast of performers, but it also creates a delightful chance for Austin/San Marcos-area families and lovers of musical theater alike to view a lost classic as it strives for a second chance at success.

The most striking aspect of “The World According to Snoopy,” at least at first, is the high-tech and modernist timbre of the set design by Michelle Ney. Fiberglass lightboxes abound, some hanging from a tree and some ported around by the cast to create props and scenery, while projection screens fill up the back wall. Snoopy’s famous doghouse dominates the stage with its own sleek, lightbox siding. This is in immediate and striking contrast to Sally Rath’s costume design, which features cartoonish, oversized dresses and shorts evoking the childlike nature of the source material.

"The World According to Snoopy." Contributed by Kathy Houle
“The World According to Snoopy.” Contributed by Kathy Houle

 

Though a bit jarring at first, these two aspects of the production ultimately do work together nicely, hinting at an important contrast in the text itself between the innocent, childish surface level and the darker emotions hiding beneath many of the punchlines and songs (a tension that was also at the heart of Schulz’s strips). Though definitely family fare, with plenty of broad humor that will play to younger audiences, “The World According to Snoopy” isn’t afraid to flirt with the darker side of human nature as revealed in the depressions and anxieties of its juvenile protagonists.

Those characters are expertly portrayed by the accomplished cast of Texas State students, especially Maggie Bera’s simmering Lucy, Ryne Nardecchia’s lovably arrogant Snoopy and Nick Eibler’s manic, acrobatic Woodstock (with the latter pair teaming up to form a vaudevillian comedic dance duo throughout the course of the show). There isn’t a single weak performance among the entire cast, who allow the show’s complex simplicity to shine through in a way that will speak to kids and adults alike.

Hopkins has assembled a mightily talented team to fulfill her shared vision of “The World According to Snoopy,” and if Texas State’s production is any prediction of the future, the world will soon be singing along with Snoopy once more.

“The World According to Snoopy” 

When: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 14-19

Where: Patti Strickel Harrison Theatre, 405 Moon St., San Marcos

Cost: $8-$15

Info: txstatepresents.com.

 

 

“Hamilton” coming to San Antonio – could Austin be in its future?

Want to see Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Tony-winning musical “Hamilton” live on stage? You won’t have to go all the way to Broadway.

The national tour of the show is coming to San Antonio for the 2018-2019 Broadway in San Antonio season, the San Antonio Express-News reports.

Daveed Diggs, Okieriete Onaodowan, Anthony Ramos, and Lin-Manuel Miranda in "Hamilton: An American Musical." CONTRIBUTED
Daveed Diggs, Okieriete Onaodowan, Anthony Ramos and Lin-Manuel Miranda in “Hamilton: An American Musical.” CONTRIBUTED

So, any chance the show could dance its way up the highway to Austin? The national touring schedule also lists Houston and Dallas for the 2018-2019 season … and says “Additional cities to be announced soon.”

We’ll be patiently waiting to see if Austin makes that list.

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‘The Great Society’ speaks powerfully to today through the politics of yesterday

Cecil Washington Jr., left, and Steve Vinovich portray Martin Luther King Jr. and President Lyndon B. Johnson in "The Great Society" at Zach Theatre. Contributed by Kirk Tuck
Cecil Washington Jr., left, and Steve Vinovich portray Martin Luther King Jr. and President Lyndon B. Johnson in “The Great Society” at Zach Theatre. Contributed by Kirk Tuck

This review written by freelance arts critic Andrew J. Friedenthal

The current political climate in the United States is tense, perhaps the worst it’s been in recent memory, but Robert Schenkkan’s “The Great Society,” playing through March 5 at Zach Theatre, reminds us that our country’s political history has seen many periods of great regression.

“The Great Society” is the second play about President Lyndon Baines Johnson written by Schenkkan, following his earlier “All the Way,” which won the 2014 Tony Award for best play and was made even more famous by Bryan Cranston’s Tony-winning portrayal of LBJ in the show’s Broadway run (later adapted into an HBO original film). Zach Theatre produced the Texas premiere of “All the Way” in 2015 and now presents the Texas premiere of “The Great Society” with the same key creative team of director Dave Steakley and powerhouse actor Steve Vinovich as LBJ.

In “The Great Society,” Schenkkan covers a great deal of ground, from LBJ’s re-election in 1964 through his decision not to run for another term — and the subsequent victory of Richard Nixon — in 1968. As a result, the play is quite long and does tend to meander some, veering between a character study of Johnson, a taut political thriller about the confluence of Johnson’s progressive domestic politics and his increasingly hawkish stance on Vietnam, and a look at the split in the civil rights movement between the pacifism of Martin Luther King Jr. and the rise of the more militant Black Power movement.

Not all these threads come together in a satisfying conclusion, but “The Great Society” is less about story structure than about revealing the tragic downfall of LBJ’s policies and the movement from “All the way with LBJ!” to “Hey, hey, LBJ, how many kids did you kill today?” It’s in the dramatic re-creation of these historical and political events where Schenkkan’s writing shines as he crafts potent drama out of the many compromises that LBJ makes and the lies he tells in order to get his policies through, slowly betraying many of his most fervent allies and becoming increasingly paranoid about whom he can trust.

The tension of these moments would be impossible without the tour de force performance given by Vinovich, whose LBJ charms as much as he dismays, drawing as much sympathy and approbation as he does criticism. A large, top-notch ensemble, in an assortment of roles, provides varying degrees of counterbalance to the larger-than-life Southernism of Vinovich’s LBJ.

Of special note here is Cecil Washington Jr., who portrays civil rights icon King with strength, dignity and lyricism while simultaneously portraying a vulnerability that lets us see into the far-from-flawless man at the heart of the icon.

It should come as no surprise that “The Great Society” has particular resonance to contemporary politics, and the final scene (which does feel a bit tacked on) directly tackles this issue, pulling the audience right into current day fears of corruption and autocracy following in the footsteps of a noble attempt at progressivism. This is not an uplifting play, but it is a necessary one, and it is a vital study for all those who wish to learn from the past in order to gain some idea of what we might do in the present.

“The Great Society”

When: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday through March 5

Where: Topfer Theatre, 202 S. Lamar Blvd.

Cost: $29-$94

Info: 512-476-0541, zachtheatre.org

 

Tenderness and brutality war on stage in “Let the Right One In”

Cristian Ortega and Lucy Mangan star in "Let the Right One In." Contributed by Lawrence Peart
Cristian Ortega and Lucy Mangan star in “Let the Right One In.” Contributed by Lawrence Peart

This review written by freelance arts critic Andrew J. Friedenthal

The National Theatre of Scotland’s production of “Let The Right One In” (playing through Jan. 29 at the McCullough Theatre at the University of Texas, as part of the Texas Performing Arts Essential Series) packs quite a bit of weight behind a vampire love story. This is no small feat for a Scottish adaptation of a popular Swedish book and movie, now touring the United States.

“Let the Right One In” succeeds in so many different forms because of the headiness and humanity underneath the surface-level horror narrative. Indeed, to call it horror is to do it a disservice, as it is also equal parts romance, Bildungsroman and complex exploration of gender and sexuality. This carefully balanced narrative can be found in the original Swedish novel by John Ajvide Lindqvist as well as the film of the same name written by Lindqvist and directed by Tomas Alfredson. (There’s also an Americanized remake, “Let Me In.”)

RELATED: National Theatre of Scotland brings blood-soaked love story to Austin

In adapting “Let the Right One In” to the stage, playwright Jack Thorne and director John Tiffany emphasize the essential humanity at the core of its two protagonists — shy, bullied 12-year-old Oskar and the ageless vampire Eli, who physically appears to be a young girl of about Oskar’s age. The two form an unlikely pair and soon develop feelings for one another, which are complicated by the people in Oskar’s life (separated, dysfunctional parents and a set of merciless bullies) and the older man, Hakan, who kills for Eli in order to obtain blood for her.

As this might suggest, there are moments of gory violence and a few scares in “Let the Right One In,” from which Tiffany does not shy away. The extreme brutality of both bullies and vampires is staged through equal parts bloody special effects and heavily stylized movement. These moments of dance-like presentation are also used to portray the intimacies of the characters, providing a level of emotional insight that might otherwise be lost in moving from the pages of a novel to the stage. It’s no wonder, with this level of theatrical magic, clever staging and simple solutions to complex visuals that Thorne and Tiffany have gone on to pair with J.K. Rowling in creating “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child.”

Here, as with “Harry Potter,” children are at the heart of the narrative. Cristian Ortega, as Oskar, gets to the core of the boy’s inherent innocence, as well as its slow erosion, with a good dash of both sadness and sweetness. Lucy Mangan, as Eli, is much bolder in her performance, befitting the character, and proves to be deliberately, and delightfully, off-putting in both style and delivery throughout the show. Also of note is Ewan Stewart, as Hakan, whose disturbing love for Eli manages to be endearing at the same time as it is frightening.

In addition to the strong performances, the play boasts a top-notch design team. Composer Ólafur Arnald’s energetic, classical-meets-rock-and-electronic score, along with Gareth Fry’s sound design, create a cinematic scope to the entire production. That sonic-scape is interestingly counterpoised to the bare, minimalist set and costume design of Christine Jones and atmospheric lighting of Chahine Yavroyan.

The overall sparseness of the production allows the moments of special effects (designed by Jeremy Chernick) to shine through all the more, every bit as stunning as they are terrifying. That mixture of awe with terror, of the heart-breaking and the pulse-quickening, is what gives “Let the Right One In” its fierce, unique energy.

This dark, moody, moving meditation about young love, complex sexuality and self-identity, beautifully staged and acted, is not to be missed while it is still in Austin.

“Let the Right One In”

When: 8 p.m. Jan 18-21, 24-28 and 2 p.m. Jan 21-22, 29

Where: McCullough Theatre, 2375 Robert Dedman Drive

Cost: $10-$40

Information: 512-477-6060, texasperformingarts.org

Quiet romanticism of ‘Bloomsday’ charms at Austin Playhouse

Huck Huckaby and Cyndi Williams in "Bloomsday." Contributed by Austin Playhouse
Huck Huckaby and Cyndi Williams in “Bloomsday.” Contributed by Austin Playhouse

This review was written by freelance arts critic Andrew J. Friedenthal

Austin playwright Stephen Dietz’s new play “Bloomsday,” receiving its Texas premiere production at Austin Playhouse through Feb. 5, is a lyrical, intriguing drama that belongs to the somewhat unique genre of “time-travel romance.” Some works have used this genre to great success (Audrey Niffenegger’s novel “The Time Traveler’s Wife”) and others to a lesser degree (Richard Curtis’ film “About Time”); “Bloomsday” fortunately falls into the former category.

Despite the time-traveling motif, “Bloomsday” is far from a work of science fiction. Indeed, it is left open to interpretation whether we are witnessing time travel, memory, fantasy or an intermingling of all three; this is, in many ways, the point of the play. Nevertheless, with its interactions between two temporal sets of a single pair of lovers, in both their younger and older incarnations, “Bloomsday” plays with the tropes and traditions of time-travel romance, but it does so in order to tease out the poetry of such encounters rather than the mechanical consequences of plot.

Robbi and Caithleen (or, as they’re known in their older versions, Robert and Cait) are the young couple at the heart of the play, meeting in Dublin, Ireland, on a Bloomsday walking tour that covers the parts of the city traveled by the character Leopold Bloom in James Joyce’s “Ulysses.” The novel itself takes on a large role in the play, with its themes, characters and language recurring throughout and its famous modernist structure mirroring the achronological flow of events in “Bloomsday.”

Claire Grasso and Aaron Johnson in "Bloomsday." Contributed by Austin Playhouse
Claire Grasso and Aaron Johnson in “Bloomsday.” Contributed by Austin Playhouse

Because of this, the exact plot of the play remains ultimately vague, but it revolves around Robert and Cait revisiting their thirty-years-younger selves’ brief moment of romance. Though the specifics of the events (and the revisitation) are somewhat muddled, the emotional resonance is never lost.

Much of that resonance comes not just from a script with beautiful language but also from four performers who have a deft hand at expressing those words. Aaron Johnson and Claire Grasso, as the young Robbie and Caithleen, are pure charm, embodying youthful romance tinged with the fears and anxieties of an unknown, unsteady future. Huck Huckaby and Cyndi Williams are far more reserved and philosophical in their portrayal of the couple’s later days and express the text’s deep melancholy just as the younger actors do its hopefulness.

Director Don Toner and his design crew have wisely gone with a very bare, stripped-down production, with just a few set pieces, props and projections to create Dietz’s (and Joyce’s) Dublin. The minimalist approach allows for the actors to fill the stage with their own emotive strength, a move that best serves the text.

“Bloomsday” is a bittersweet love story awash in a sentiment that is equal parts American and Irish, and Austin Playhouse’s production, with four talented actors at its heart, does that story quiet, poetic justice.

“BLOOMSDAY”

When: 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 5 p.m. Sunday through Feb. 5.

Where: Austin Playhouse, 6001 Airport Blvd.

Cost: $14-$36

austinplayhouse.com

‘Hir’ upends conventions of gender and family with dark hilarity

From left, Roxy Becker, Jay Byrd, and Nate Jackson star in "Hir" by Taylor Mac, at the Off Center through Jan. 22.  Contributed by Capital T Theatre
From left, Roxy Becker, Jay Byrd and Nate Jackson star in “Hir.” Contributed by Capital T Theatre

This review was written by freelance arts critic Andrew J. Friedenthal

I’m a big fan of the black comedies that seem to be the stock in trade for Austin’s Capital T Theatre company. I leave most of their productions a little out of breath from having laughed so hard, and sometimes from my choked sorrow at their tragic endings. Much of the company’s work in recent years— “Year of the Rooster,” “Trevor” and “Hand to God,” for example — have been big, muscular, athletic character pieces that focus on physicality as much as philosophy.

Capital T’s current production—Taylor Mac’s “Hir,” directed by Delanté G. Keys and playing at the Off Center through Jan. 22 — is something of a departure in this regard. Not that it isn’t funny, nor are the performances anything less than physically demanding, but “Hir” is ultimately a comedy of ideas as much as it is a comedy of characters, where the philosophical and sociopolitical ideologies on stage are as important as the relationships being explored.

“Hir” begins with Isaac, a young man who has been working in the Marines mortuary division in the Middle East, returning home to his family’s run-down, lower middle class suburban house. Far from receiving a hero’s welcome, however, Isaac finds that the entire house and family have been upended in the years that he’s been gone.

His abusive father, Arnold, suffered a debilitating stroke and is now subject to the whims of his mother, Paige, who has liberated herself from his control by treating him like a pet and doing everything around the house the exact opposite as he used to (thus keeping it freezing cold and covered in clutter and mess). Meanwhile, Isaac’s teenage sister, Max, has begun transitioning into a boy who prefers the pronouns “ze” and “hir” instead of “he” and “him.”

“Hir” is a play of identity politics, and the ways in which we, as the audience, identify and sympathize with the various characters is in constant flux throughout the performance. Isaac’s ostensible normality is quickly stripped away as we discover the extent of his post-traumatic stress disorder, while Paige’s overbearing nonconformity gets viewed through the lens of her own anguish. Their struggle with each other — which pulls in Arnold and Max as pawns—becomes the conflict of the play, and its dark heart.

All four performers in “Hir” turn in solid work. Nate Jackson’s Isaac simmers with anger and trauma, while Roxy Becker, as Paige, is deliberately and delightfully off-putting with her abrasive cheerfulness covering up an inner darkness. Dillon Uriegas, as Max, is wonderful at portraying the ambiguities and confusion that plague a transitioning youth (as well as any listless teenager, regardless of gender). Jay Byrd, though, delivers a tour de force performance as Arnold, fully committing to the physical and mental debilitation of the character while still imbuing him with equal parts nobility and monstrosity.

Capped off with the usual top-notch Capital T design and production value, the intellectual script, dark conflicts, layered performances and unflinchingly intimate direction of “Hir” make for a powerful, if far from uplifting, evening of theater.

‘HIR’

When: 8 p.m. Thursday-Sunday through Jan. 22

Where: The Off Center, 2211 Hidalgo St.

Cost: $20-$30

Information: capitalt.org

Stagehand union battle plays out at Austin City Council

Simmering internal tension over potential union representation at Zach Theatre took the stage in Austin City Council chambers Thursday when council members proposed requiring arts organizations that want public money to work with labor unions.

The council passed the requirements — subject to being further hashed out between now and February — after two hours of back-and-forth arguments from theater leaders, Zach employees, union organizers and other community members.

The changes to the city’s cultural services agreement require organizations that take city money or use city property to recognize any labor organization designated via a card-check method and cooperate with it. If not, they could lose funding in future years.

A Zach stagehand, who said she was representing many too afraid to speak out, said employees there have long been trying to unionize. Katie Anderson said her hours had been cut and her uniform changed as retaliation for heading up the organization effort.

Later, the pro-union forces gasped when Zach Managing Director Elisbeth Challener denied those allegations. Anderson shouted back from the audience that a manager had told employees not to sign cards to organize.*

“There is not a labor dispute at Zach,” Challener said.

presstopfer1

Many Zach employees turned out in support of their management to say they resented efforts by a local union to push the theater to “join their little club,” as Stage Chief Taylor Novak put it.

Zach used $10.8 million in city bonds to build its Topfer Theatre and sits on city property. This year it’s set to receive $210,000 from the city. Its budget is roughly comparable to The Long Center and The Paramount Theatre, which both have employees represented by unions.

Supporters of Zach’s management argued that a check-card system of unionizing versus a secret-ballot system allowed union representatives to bully employees into joining. Meanwhile, the council measures require that theater management “maintain a neutral posture.”

Two different theater-management supporters compared that to Donald Trump getting to talk for an hour while Hillary Clinton had a sock in her mouth, or Trump having the sole power to collect and count votes and then tell Clinton who won. (Trump represented the labor union in both of those analogies, adding a layer of dissonance to the discussion.)

The council majority disagreed and approved the contract amendments over the protests of Council Members Don Zimmerman and Sheri Gallo, with Council Member Ora Houston abstaining. In February, they said, they will determine the consequences for organizations that don’t comply.

*This story has been updated to clarify Anderson’s comments. She responded while Challener was speaking, but later said she was shouting to another theater employee, Director of Production Paul Flint.

Theater review: ‘W.’ serves as vehicle for amazing one-man performance

 

This review is by American-Statesman freelance arts critic Andrew J. Friedenthal

Joey Hood stars in "W." Photo by Jared Slack.
Joey Hood stars in “W.” Photo by Jared Slack.

 

Georg Büchner’s “Woyzeck” is famously an unfinished play, left in fragments when the German playwright died in 1837 at the age of 23. It has been performed and adapted many times in the centuries since, becoming a standard of the German – and (in translation) American – stage.

Now, the Austin Jewish Repertory Theater presents “W.,” an adaptation by playwright Zachary Christman that stars Joey Hood in an intense one-man show. “W.,” playing through Aug. 27 at the Trinity Street Players’ black box theater, puts Hood through his paces as he takes on a variety of characters and personas to depict Büchner’s dark classic.

“Woyzeck” tells the story of its titular protagonist, a young man used and abused by both the military and the medical establishment. His harassment at the hands of superiors, doctors and his own wife slowly take a toll, drawing him into a web of jealousy and anger that ends violently and decisively.

Christman’s adaptation is serviceable, if not remarkable, but it succeeds in providing a vehicle for a staggering performance. Throughout the intense hourlong show, Hood portrays seven characters, as well as a few animals for good measure. With minimal costuming, he clearly evokes the differing – and often conflicting – personalities and desires of these individuals, relying upon voice, physicality and full mental embodiment to make each character distinct and unique.

Scott Ferguson’s scenic design and Jenny Lavery’s lighting effectively serve as Hood’s scene partners, allowing for the creation of specific locations through simple set pieces and clear lighting choices, while composer Tyler Mabry’s original score underlines the entire performance. Director Adam Roberts pulls these threads together to weave a cohesive tapestry that keeps Hood forever at its center, showcasing his prodigious talent.

“W.” is not the strongest adaptation of “Woyzeck” ever put on the stage, but ultimately the script is less important than the production and the actor performing it. Austin Jewish Repertory has both a strong production and, in the phenomenally adaptable Hood, an amazing actor giving a muscular, energetic and heart-wrenching performance, making “W.” a show worth seeing.

“W.” continues through Aug. 27; austinjewishrep.org.

Catch Pokemon fever – and some classical music – at the Long Center

Pokemon-Symphonic-Evolutions_event1

 

If your days are spent plotting ways to capture a Charmeleon or Ninetales, this is the concert for you.

The Long Center presents Pokémon: Symphonic Evolutions at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 7 in Dell Hall. The event combines music performed by a full orchestra with visuals from Pokemon video games. Tickets are on sale now for $29-$89 and can be bought on the Long Center’s website or by calling 512-474-5664.

The concert will draw from recent and classic Pokemon games, including:

  • Pokemon Red and Pokemon Blue
  • Pokemon Yellow
  • Pokemon Gold and Pokemon Silver
  • Pokemon Crystal
  • Pokemon Ruby and Pokemon Sapphire
  • Pokemon Emerald
  • Pokemon Diamond and Pokemon Pearl
  • Pokemon Platinum
  • Pokemon Black and Pokemon White
  • Pokemon X and Pokemon Y