San Antonio Symphony capsizes again

The San Antonio Symphony, periodically threatened, has canceled the rest of its 2017-2018 season.

Over the weekend, its board of directors decided to suspend play by symphony. Its tricentennial performances this weekend will be its final ones.

John Davenport /San Antonio Express-News

Almost every year since I started reporting on the arts in the 1980s, the San Antonio Symphony has been on the brink of disaster. And I remember stories about its precarious state from my youth.
It’s one of those cases where the old-school donors always insisted it had to compete in size and quality with Houston and Dallas, but without the financial resources, foundations or corporate headquarters that fueled those ensembles. Old San Antonio just never believed they had been left behind.
Austin could never compete in those leagues and knew it, and so remained smallish, part-time and pay-per-play. At one point, discussions were underway to merge the management of the Austin Symphony and its sibling counterpart.
The most recent corporate white knight for San Antonio was H-E-B. Obviously, it didn’t work out.
The more progressive-minded forces down there thought they had solved part of the problem when they moved from the drafty, oversized Majestic Theatre — their counterpart to the Paramount Theatre, but on steroids, since SA was the big city in Texas in the 1920s — to the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, a smart project not unlike the Long Center for the Performing Arts that renovated an old, multi-purpose municipal auditorium.
In fact, some of the same design players were involved.
That clearly didn’t work either. The board needed $2.5 million to complete the season.
“We would not be able to raise that much money in such an abbreviated time,” Alice Viroslav, board chairwoman of the 78-year-old Symphony Society of San Antonio, told the Express-News.